Author Topic: Idiot beginner trying to image Jupiter  (Read 2048 times)

Beagleboy

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Idiot beginner trying to image Jupiter
« on: May 10, 2016, 12:23:06 PM »
Hey folks.


I'm quite new to this astronomy malarky having only dipped my toes into the universe last September with the purchase of a Skywatcher Skyliner 200p, on a Dobsonian mount. I know it's not suited to astro imaging, but all I want to do is to be able to take the odd photo of the Moon etc, so I can bore my mates on Facebook.


With that in mind, and having had a very wobbly go at trying to snap images with a camera in front of the eyepiece (I think it's called afocal?), I managed to get my hands on a cheapo Orion Starshoot Solar System Colour Imager IV USB webcam that fits into the eyepiece. The lunar images I've gotten from it have been breathtaking,absolutely fabulous, and more than enough to fool my mates into thinking that I know what I'm doing. Even though in reality they're a bit blurry and wouldn't pass muster with you lot, I'm happy with them. :-)


What I'd really like to get a video of now is Jupiter, but I'm completely stumped! I can get him onscreen no problem, but only as a featureless white blob. No matter how I adjust settings in the various programs I've tried ( Wxastrocapture, Sharpcap and Ampcap), I'm always presented with this white, featureless circle about the size of a 10p on the screen with the moons visible at it's side.


I tried adding my x2.5 Revelation barlow to see if it was a focus problem as I'm near the limit of inward adjustment on my focuser when using the camera, but that didn't seem to make a difference either. I'm happy to accept that I've maybe got the wrong tools for the job, is that simply the case? Is Jupiter simply too small and distant a target for my camera and scope setup to work with?


Any advice would be appreciated!


C. :-)


blinky

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Re: Idiot beginner trying to image Jupiter
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2016, 09:15:20 PM »
Sounds like you need to lower the gain of the camera, your focus position will be the same as the moon so if you can image that you should be fine. As I say look for a gain setting and lower it till you get something....

Beagleboy

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Re: Idiot beginner trying to image Jupiter
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2016, 10:22:47 PM »
Buhwaaa ha!


I solved the puzzle.....I'm an idiot!


Apparently I'm seeing a big white blob, because it's too bright! Even with the exposure,gain and pretty much everything else...turned down to zero, I wasn't seeing any features. However, just out of curiosity, I screwed my moon filter into the camera and wayhey....I can see cloud bands.


Happy bunny, cheers for pointing me in the right direction Blinky. ;-)


C.


stuhawk123

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Re: Idiot beginner trying to image Jupiter
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2016, 05:49:28 PM »
next time you go out try a blue A filter and turn down the Exposure Compensation, most of the shots of the Planets i have done, i have used them , however i video the target, rather than taking a single shot, this way you can compensate for edge blur, i have a video online showing exactly what you need to do with the video footage , the same can be done with multiple single shots , just stack them and the software will do the adjustments , it would also help if you take note of some of the Photoshop methods that are used to clean up the image,   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLeBLyAMdl0   
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Andy

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Re: Idiot beginner trying to image Jupiter
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2016, 10:03:18 AM »
I will check out the vid as well I think. Can't have too much info
300mm Skywatcher Truss Dobsonian
80mm Celestron wide field refractor
Telrad and 9X50 RACI finder
Meade 5000 32mm/Q70 38mm/Skwatcher Nirvana 82 degree 28mm, 16mm, 7mm/Explore Scientific 100 degree 20mm/ Vixen LV 9mm /Televue Delos 4.5mm/ Televue Radian12mm and x2 Astro Revelation Barlow
Nikon D5000